Teaching Children

(Thinkstock)My boss is a teacher. Not the one who works at the college and who is an actual teacher. The other one.

I doubt, though, that he lists that title or its corresponding skillset on his CV or resume. He probably doesn’t pitch it to clients, either.

Maybe he should.

Because it may be that single talent that serves his clients better than all others.

When he plays Socrates to his young staff, he isn’t just teambuilding; he’s inducing them to think more critically and to be more creative. At the same time he asks them to think inside the box—to use analysis and numbers—he also encourages them to step outside of it, to take a chance, ask a question, find a new answer.

He’s a teacher—and an effective one—even though his job description
doesn’t allude to it.

When we do our jobs right, whatever those jobs may be, we all have the opportunity to teach. Whether we’re educating those who report to us, our coworkers or clients, there’s much to be said for imparting a little of our own hard earned wisdom unto others. It robs us of nothing and has the potential to enrich those with whom we share and ourselves.

I think many of my students have figured out that the real stuff I’m teaching them has little to do with what augments their readings and assignments. They do like that I can often pull from the trove in my head to quickly solve their academic queries (I’ve got a few of them snowed –they don’t understand that it’s less intelligence and more age that gives me such easy access to answers). They like it even more when I can settle a life crisis with a tempered response, although I know that the blasé been-there-done-that mode with which I operate sometimes frustrates them. They’re used to
drama-matching-drama so when I meet their crazy with calm, it takes some
getting used to. Many of them do –not all.

It’s taken me awhile to acquiesce to my role as teacher, but my resistance makes little sense. After all, as parents, the first time we see our bad habits on handy display at family functions, we know exactly from whom our offspring got it. For better or worse, we taught them.

We are forced to be teachers as parents; we should embrace the role as people.

In any encounter, there is opportunity to teach –and learn.

I’d be kidding myself if I thought the teacher-student paradigm only went one way. I learn a whole lot from my students. They keep me connected, both figuratively and literally if you count how often we text. And they allow me access to their sometimes foreign mindset and a generational world I would otherwise only see from afar.

I’ve always liked foreign travel—once upon a time I did it a lot—so now even if I never leave our eastern shores, I’ll willingly take passage on the sometimes rocky ride my students provide and be thankful for some pretty awesome tour guides.